Monday, 15 April 2024
Athens
07
03
2024
The “4th Women In Digital Forum”, the conference made “institution” for Women in Tech, STEM and Digital is coming on March 7th, 2024 in the form of a different and inspiring event, combining dialogue about the present and the future, with a glittering celebration of what has been achieved to date. In a world driven by Technology, the “4th Women In Digital Forum”, will seek to amplify voices, reduce differences and shape the appropriate dialogue framework for the rightful place of women in business, public sphere, and society. Riper, stronger and richer, the 4th Women In Digital Forum will highlight every point of view and proposal to break down barriers, in a quest for an inclusive community, where every woman can thrive and make a meaningful impact. Through critical discussions, engaging panels, workshops and networking opportunities, Smart Press aims to create a supportive ecosystem that propels women forward in their digital careers. Join as we explore the limitless possibilities in the digital world and showcase the diverse talents and perspectives women bring to the table. Participants include Hellenic Labor Minister Domna Michailidou.  Visit womenindigital.gr for more details and registration.  
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Athens
22
02
2024
According to the figures, released to mark World Radio Day, Spain, with 714 stations, Italy (679), Greece (599), France (343) and Portugal (299) held the top five spots in 2022 in terms of the number of radio stations. The countries with the fewest radio stations were Luxembourg (5), Estonia (9), Slovakia (14), Malta (19) and Lithuania (20). In terms of stations per million population, Slovenia recorded the highest ratio with 75 stations enterprises per million inhabitants, followed by Greece (57), Malta (36), Cyprus and Croatia (both 35). In contrast, the lowest ratios were found in Poland (2), Germany and Slovakia (both 3), the Czech Republic (4) and Austria, France and Sweden (all 5).   
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Los Angeles
23
01
2024
Leading the nominations in this year's Oscar awards, which will take place in Los Angeles on March 10, is Christopher Nolan's "Oppenheimer", with 13 nominations. "Poor Things" has been nominated for the following Oscars: Male Supporting Role (Mark Ruffalo) Leading Female Role (Emma Stone) Cinematography (Robbie Ryan) Costume Design (Holly Waddington) Directing (Yorgos Lanthimos) Film Editing (Yorgos Mavropsaridis) Makeup and Hairstyling (Nadia Stacey, Mark Coulier and Josh Weston) Music (Jerskin Fendrix) Best Picture (Producers' award) Production Design (Production Design: James Price and Shona Heath; Set Decoration: Zsuzsa Mihalek) Writing/Adapted Screenplay (Screenplay by Tony McNamara) Contending for an Oscar as Best Picture are the following films: American Fiction, Anatomy of a Fall, Barbie, The Holdovers, Killers of the Flower Moon, Maestro, Oppenheimer, Past Lives, Poor Things, and The Zone of Interest, the Academy said.
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Istanbul
21
10
2023
Establishing permanent channels of communication as well as consultation mechanisms between the media professionals in both countries was also emphasized. Athens-Macedonian News Agency (ANA-MPA) President & General Director Aimilios Perdikaris, 'Kathimerini' newspaper Executive Editor Alexis Papachelas, national broadcaster ERT correspondent in Istanbul Yiannis Mandalidis, and 'Kathimerini' and 'Skai' correspondent in the same city Manolis Kostidis were among those who participated on the Greek side. In addition, professors Constantinos Filis, Kostas Ifantis, Sotiris Serbos and Panagiota Manoli also attended. In his intervention, Perdikaris highlighted the key role national news agencies play in terms of a positive agenda as basic providers of news content, based on "the duty to truth" they have that requires they remain strict about presenting the news rather than proceeding to comment on them. He also observed that often in the mass media of the two countries positive developments are downgraded in favor of promoting extreme statements that do not add to the resolution of what de facto divides Greece and Türkiye at political and diplomatic level. For this exact reason, he added, dialog and communication between news professionals is significant in order to mitigate the mutual distrust of public opinion, and he referred to issues that concern both Greece and Türkiye in common, such as the climate crisis and dealing with natural catastrophes, or the migration issue. In addition, in terms of the social media and their role in Greek-Turkish relations, Perdikaris noted that they hide traps because of anonymity, and news agencies are called upon to contribute decisively to cross-checking information and its validity. Kathimerini's Papahelas proposed setting up mechanisms of communication among journalists and mass media in Greece and Türkiye, in order to bring them closer and to serve as a 'safety net' in possible crises. He specifically said that this can be achieved with programs of journalist exchanges between Greek and Turkish mass media, like those of college student exchanges, and by establishing a line of communication among directors of the most important media outlets of both countries, introducing mutual visits of executives, and having the executives attend editorial meetings, and so on. Speaking on behalf of Anadolu Agency, Deputy Director General Yusuf Özhan pointed out the significance of cooperation between the two national news agencies, and their ability to directly communicate between them. He also referred to three elements that affect Greek-Turkish relations negatively when portrayed by the two countries' media: misunderstanding, misinformation and mistrust, calling them 'the three Ms'. TRT World Director Bora Bayraktar referred to the positive developments in Greek-Turkish relations both presently and in the past, and he too underlined the need to support these relations through the promotion of the positive agenda by the two countries' mass media. In the second segment of the discussion, academics referred to how their communities in Greece and in Türkiye approach the matter. They agreed that they can decisively help in shaping the positive agenda so that it can contribute in overcoming past traumas. The event was organized by Foundation for Türkiye Studies (TAV) and the Institute of Global Affairs (IGA).  
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Athens
08
06
2023
SYRIZA-Progressive Alliance had also requested a one-on-one debate between its leader Alexis Tsipras and New Democracy leader Kyriakos Mitsotakis but it was rejected by the other party representatives. Party leaders will be called to answer questions grouped into six thematic sections: economy, development and jobs; foreign policy and defense; State, institutions and transparency; health, education and the social state; environment and energy; and youth. The debate will be held ahead of the June 25 runoff elections, at the premises of national broadcaster ERT. Questions will be asked by 6 journalists and the debate will be moderated by journalist Giorgos Kouvaras, who moderated the May 10th debate, ahead of the May 21st ballot.
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Paris
17
05
2023
The map purports that the Greek islands of Chios, Samos, Ikaria, Kos, Ios, Amorgos and Rhodes voted for Kemal Kilicdaroglu of the Republican People’s Party in Sunday’s presidential election in the neighboring State. Diplomatic sources in Athens said that, on the instructions of Foreign Minister Nikos Dendias, Ambassador Dimitrios Zevelakis wrote to the newspaper, calling on it to remove the infographic, which gave Turkish state-run news agency Anadolu as its source. Le Monde is understood to have removed the map in question from its website.
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Athens
14
05
2023
The presentation of the campaign was held on Thursday at the GNTO’s press hall in the presence of Tourism Minister Vassilis Kikilias, GNTO President Angela Gerekou, GNTO Secretary-General Dimitris Fragakis and representatives from Greece’s tourism sector in the context of the assessment of the organization’s work in the 2019-2023 period. Watch it here: https://youtu.be/PlCPx9yETCo
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Liverpool
10
05
2023
Liverpool is hosting on behalf of Ukraine, which won the contest last with Kalush Orchestra’s “Stefania.” Ukraine was unable to stage the event this year, as the winner usually does, because of Russia’s invasion. Britain, which came second, is promising to combine the creativity of Ukraine and the UK under the banner “United by Music.”   Who will compete? There are 37 countries taking part with 31 competing in two semi-finals and 10 going through to the Grand Final. Ukraine, as the previous winner, automatically progresses to the Grand Final, along with the “big five,” comprising the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Spain and Italy. Who is Greece’s entry   Victor Vernicos who will perform his original song “What They Say” in the second semi-final on Thursday. Aged 16, local Instagram sensation Vernicos is the youngest-ever contestant to represent Greece at the competition. When are the semi-finals? Tuesday, May 9 and Thursday, May 11 at 10 p.m. (Greek time). Who competes in semi-final one? Norway, Malta, Serbia, Latvia, Portugal, Ireland, Croatia, Switzerland, Israel, Moldova, Sweden, Azerbaijan, Czechia, Netherlands, Finland Who competes in semi-final two? Denmark, Armenia, Romania, Estonia, Belgium, Cyprus, Iceland, Greece, Poland, Slovenia, Georgia, San Marino, Austria, Albania, Lithuania, Australia When is the grand final? Saturday, May 13 at 10 p.m. (Greek time). Who competes in the grand final? Previous winner Ukraine, host United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy and Spain, plus the top 10 from each semi-final How does the voting work? Viewers at home will determine the outcome of the two semi-finals. Viewers and professional juries vote in the Grand Final. Semi-final 1: viewers in the 15 countries taking part are eligible to vote, alongside France, Germany, and Italy. Semi-final 2: Viewers in the 16 countries taking part are eligible to vote, alongside Spain, Ukraine, and the UK. In a new development, viewers from non-participating countries around the world will also be able to vote, and will have the weight of one additional voting country. Grand Final: Juries from all 37 countries allocate points 1-8, 10 and 12 to 10 acts, excluding their own country, based on performances in the second dress reversal on Friday. The audience votes from each country, based on the live Grand Final, are used to allocate the same scale of points, with the rest of the world counting for one additional country. A total of 2,146 points are available from the juries are and 2,204 from the audience votes. Who will host the grand final? Graham Norton, the host of an eponymous chat show on BBC television and Britain’s usual Eurovision commenter. Alesha Dixon, a British television personality and pop singer. Julia Sanina, front woman of Ukrainian rock band The Hardkiss. Hanna Waddingham, a star of musical theatre and television.
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Athens
05
02
2023
A historical documentary by Maria Iliou and a photographic exhibition. What was Athens like after the first Olympic Games of the modern era in 1896, and until 1922? Why did Athenians go to the front for so many wars, like the war of 1897, the Balkan wars of 1912-1913, World War I in 1917 and the Asia Minor campaign from 1919 to 1922? How was Athens transformed from the era of the Belle Epoque to the Athens of the Great Idea and the National Schism, and how was the city transformed, in September 1922? Through widely unknown archival visual material from three continents, photographs and film footage discovered and preserved in America, Australia and Europe, director Maria Iliou, historical consultant Alexandros Kitroef and their collaborators once again weave a fascinating story, told in a documentary film and an accompanying photographic exhibition at the Benaki Museum of Hellenic Culture, at 1 Koumbari Street. The year 1896, following the first modern Olympic Games, was defined by a widespread sense of optimism in Athens, a rather insignificant city of just 130,000. It was a time when “little Greece” began cultivating aspirations of victory, reaching out to realize the Great Idea by reclaiming the territories of the Byzantine Empire – including Constantinople, the center of Hellenism. The overwhelming majority of Greeks believed the plan to be feasible, with hundreds of volunteers going off to fight in the Greco-Turkish War of 1897, explains Roderick Beaton, Emeritus Koraes Professor of Modern Greek and Byzantine History, Language and Literature at King’s College London, pre-eminent authority on Greek history and philhellene, in the opening scene of a new documentary by Maria Iliou. Lasting just one month and ending in Greece’s defeat, the campaign also became known as “Black 97” and the “Unfortunate War.” In “Athens and the Great Idea 1896-1922,”  the renowned filmmaker, her historical adviser Alexander Kitroeff, professor of history at Haverford College in Pennsylvania, and the rest of her team pick up the thread of the narrative at the revival of the Olympic Games and the newfound confidence of the Greeks, who became increasingly convinced that the ancient Greek spirit and the Byzantine tradition would be key to unlocking the vision of “Greater Greece.” Iliou spent 20 years gathering the material for this project. “The majority of the films and photographs are very rare indeed and quite intoxicating; they don’t just transmit information, but stir all sorts of thoughts and emotions,” says Iliou, whose previous work includes the critically acclaimed “The Journey: The Greek American Dream” (2007), “Smyrna, the Destruction of a Cosmopolitan City – 1900-1922” (2012) and “From Both Sides of the Aegean, 1922-1924” (2012). With Roderick Beaton (Professor Emeritus at the Korais Chair at King's College and Chairman of the Board of the British School of Athens), Katherine Fleming (New York University), Nikos Vatopoulos (Kathimerini Newspaper), Christina Koulouri (Panteion University), Alexandros Kitroef (Haverford College), Jim Wright (American School of Classical Studies), Marina Lambraki Plaka (former Director of the National Gallery), Sir Michael Llewellyn Smith (King's College, London), while Despina Geroulanou and Philip Mazarakis-Ainian tell family stories from the National Schism. To find out more about the concept and visitor information, log on to https://www.benaki.org/index.php?option=com_events&view=event&id=1019492&lang=en.
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Athens
03
02
2023
Cities, computers, and communities all feature in an exhibition presented across two episodes. With material from the Constantinos A. Doxiadis Archives and with new research into contemporary Athens, the exhibition traces how the postwar and our contemporary periods are linked through ideas about data, space, and people. The exhibition examines one of the most pressing and transformational conditions of the last half century—the overlapping and intertwining of cities, people, and information systems. The exhibition shows this in two episodes. The first covers the prescient use of computers in the 1960s by the Greek architect and internationally celebrated planner of cities, Constantinos A. Doxiadis through the work of DACC—the Doxiadis Associates Computer Center. The second episode traces these computational practices to present day Athens, with new research into the physical form, technical administration, and territorial spread of city and state border management systems. Each episode pivots around a population group and a form of information collection. In the 1960s, Doxiadis Associates ran The Human Community, a DACC-assisted study of Athenian residents that gauged their adaptation to the growth and pace of the postwar city. The exhibition includes The New Human Community, a critical restaging of Doxiadis’ survey conducted with recently arrived residents and refugees. The Machine at the Heart of Man: Constantinos Doxiadis’ Informational Modernism tracks how our contemporary and postwar periods are linked through techniques of data extraction and accumulation. In the exhibition, these two episodes chart Greece’s emerging informational geography, locating its boundaries, borders, and the data subjects they engender. With its mainframe UNIVAC and spinning tape drives, DACC was a startling venture for an architecture office in the 1960s. Doxiadis belonged to a cohort of international architects and intellectuals appraising the implications of new digital technologies for the future of cities. Unlike his peers, who often considered this impact abstractly or theoretically, the techniques and products of computation were deeply integrated into Doxiadis’ practice. Spanning early analog data collection to later urban computation, the exhibition recasts Doxiadis’ practice through informational processes and automation, placing it within the emerging postindustrial logics of the 1960s and 1970s. The exhibition also puts the Doxiadis Associates Computer Center in communication with our current debates on computation and community. For Doxiadis, community was an ideal of social integration and resident satisfaction. It was also a dynamic measure of urban scale seen via neighborhood boundaries made volatile by postwar upheaval and migration. For many residents of contemporary Athens, these local boundaries have multiplied and expanded to encompass state borders and their control systems. While The Human Community and DACC mark a pivotal early moment in the historical formation and articulation of computational urbanism, the information extraction technologies that appear at and through this contemporary border complex are its most current elaboration.   Dates 28.01 —26.02.2023 Wednesday - Sunday 18:00 - 23:00 Exhibition Hall -1 Tickets Free admission Venue Onassis Stegi To find out more about the concept and visitor information, log on to https://www.onassis.org/whats-on/constantinos-doxiadis-human-communities.
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Athens
21
01
2023
The bill, which had been submitted by the Hellenic Culture Ministry, was approved by New Democracy, SYRIZA-Progressive Alliance and PASOK-KINAL. The Communist Party of Greece, Greek Solution and MeRA25 voted 'present' in proceedings.
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Athens
08
01
2023
- Disclosure - With the war in Ukraine and Russian President Vladimir Putin's more or less clear threats, the possibility of a nuclear war, or at least a tactical nuclear strike, is back in the public debate as never before in decades. "We were faced with the prospect of an Apocalypse from Kennedy and the Cuban Missile Crisis" in 1962, summed up US President Joe Biden in early October. Against Moscow, the nuclear-armed powers are forced to seriously question their deterrence capability and possible response. - Certification - The blue tick that authenticates the owner of a Twitter account speaks for itself of the cacophony that has dominated the social network since it was acquired in late October for $44 billion by billionaire Elon Musk. After launching a paid version of profile authentication, the social network is forced to suspend the new system after just 2 days: due to a lack of identity verification, many accounts falsely appear to belong to celebrities or big businesses, from basketball player LeBron James to Nintendo. At the end of November comes a new announcement: Twitter will soon release gray, gold and blue indicators to distinguish the different kinds of verified accounts on the platform. - "Woman, Life, Freedom" - The slogan of protesters in Iran, which has become one of the symbols of the protest movement that erupted after the death of 22-year-old Iranian-Kurdish Mahsha Amini on September 16, three days after she was arrested in Tehran by morality police for not wearing the right dress her headscarf, for violating the Islamic Republic's strict dress code. This can be heard in the almost daily protests that have been very violently suppressed since Amini's death, mentioned in the messages of support on social media, in Iran and abroad, and even written on a banner in the stadium at the first Iranian football match in the World Cup. - White glue - Many Chinese have been expressing their opposition to the government and its strict "zero COVID-19" policy since late November, inventing ways to bypass censorship and show their anger and support at the protests. In several cities, including Beijing, protesters are holding up white sticky notes of A4 paper in solidarity, referring to the lack of freedom of expression in China. Others also leave blank squares on their WeChat profile. - London Bridge - From the announcement of death to the funeral protocol and the circumstances of her successor's recovery to the throne, Operation London Bridge provides a step-by-step account of the events following the death of Queen Elizabeth II, who died on September 8th at the age of 96, after 70 years on the throne of the United Kingdom of Great Britain. Although it has been set up in the finest detail for years and has been revised frequently, the need to make last-minute adjustments has arisen as the Queen breathed her last in Scotland, far from the British capital. - "Losses and Damages" - After a year that has sadly shown the acceleration of the devastating effects of global warming, the UN climate conference finally reaches an agreement, described as "historic", to create a fund intended to compensate for climate "losses". and damage', which the poorest countries are already experiencing. This measure, which is adopted almost overnight, while it is not even on the agenda of COP27 -- a conference with an otherwise rather contradictory report -- is a request for time by the poorest countries. Mainly afraid of admitting any legal responsibility, the rich countries, which historically emit the largest amount of greenhouse gases, have rejected it for years.   - Post-fascist - A century after Benito Mussolini came to power, the victory of the far-right "Brothers of Italy" party in parliamentary elections in late September allowed its leader, Giorgia Meloni, to become Italy's first female prime minister. The leader of the "post-fascist" party has not stopped trying to reassure people since her election. "I have never had sympathy or closeness to anti-democratic regimes. For any regime, including fascism," emphasizes the one who in her youth was an admirer of Mussolini.   - "Roe v. Wade" - In a historic twist, the ultra-conservative US Supreme Court in June is burying the landmark 1973 "Roe v. Wade" decision, which guaranteed American women's right to abortion but had never been embraced by the religious right. His decision ushers the US into a post-Roe v. Wade world, where each state is free to approve or disapprove voluntary pregnancy terminations on its own soil. Some fifteen have banned them, while epic political and legal battles are underway elsewhere, a testament to the passions that the abortion issue still stirs in the country. The results of the recent midterm elections in the US for Congress, however, give the opportunity for many supporters of the right to abortion to rejoice in many victories, such as the one in the very conservative state of Kentucky, where voters rejected in a referendum an anti-rights proposal in abortion.   - Saving - Lower the heating, wear warm clothes, limit the use of electrical appliances...: in the midst of an energy crisis and in the context of the war in Ukraine and the desire to wean ourselves off Russian natural gas, calls to save energy are multiplying, especially in Europe. Aimed at avoiding outages and breakdowns and also part of the fight against climate change, this much-hyped savings is also for many consumers an economic necessity in many countries hit hard by inflation.   - Tomato soup - Tomato soup is thrown at Vincent van Gogh's "Sunflowers" in London, mashed potatoes at Claude Monet's "Veils" near Berlin, flour in a BMW, Andy Warhol's work in Milan...: the end of the year is marked by protest actions by environmental activists aimed at artworks to raise public awareness of climate change. The artworks, which are covered by protective glass -- to which other activists stick their hands, as happened with Johannes Vermeer's famous painting "Girl with a Pearl Earring" -- are not damaged. These and other actions by these activists, such as stopping sports matches or blocking roads, are aimed at re-heating the climate debate, even at the risk of provoking reactions from part of the public opinion.
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