Thursday, 22 February 2024

Ancient Sights of Athens

Amidst the whispers of history, the ancient sights of Athens stand as timeless testaments to the city's grandeur, inviting modern wanderers to walk in the footsteps of philosophers and legends under the watchful gaze of the Acropolis.

THE FAVORITE ANCIENT SIGHTS OF OUR VISITORS

The Parthenon Temple
The Parthenon Temple

The Parthenon is the universal symbol of the ancient Greek civilization and is internationally recognized as the epitome of its glory. By the decision of Pericles, who was in charge of the whole project, the sculptor Phidias and the architects Iktinos and Kallikratis, the temple was built during 447 – 438 B.C., and was decorated between 438 and 432 B.C..

The Erechtheio
The Erechtheio

Another jewel on Acropolis Hill is the Temple of Erechtheio with the world famous Karyatides. The Erechtheio was built as a replacement of the older temple of Athena that was destroyed by the Persians, around 420 B.C..

Temple of Hephaestus
Temple of Hephaestus

The Temple of Hephaestus – known as the Thision or Hephaisteion – began to be built in 449 B.C. by Ictinus. It was one of the first structures in the reconstruction program of Pericles and, today, is the best preserved monument in the Ancient Agora and the best saved temple in Athens.

Theater of Dionysus
Theater of Dionysus

The Theater of Dionysus was built on the southern decline of the sacred hill of Acropolis. This is the place where ancient Greek drama was born.

Stoa of Attalus
Stoa of Attalus

The Stoa of Attalus was constructed by the King of Pergamon Attalus the 2nd near 150 B.C. It was an impressive, two stories and was a place for gathering of crowds to watch the Panathenaic procession go by in the front.

Kallimarmaro (Ancient Marble Stadium)
Kallimarmaro (Ancient Marble Stadium)

The space that now houses the Kallimarmaro Stadium was originally a natural ground cavity nestled between two elevations around river Ilissos, the hills of Agra and Ardittos. Lycurgus built the stadium during 330-329 B.C. for the Great Panathinaic Games.

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